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Super Bowl MVP Joe Namath shares his experience with hyperbaric oxygen therapy

When a former teammate told him about the major mental problems he was having that he lined to football injuries, Joe got worried about his own brain.

More than 1.7 million people sustain traumatic brain injuries every year. They happen on our roadways, on the battle field, on the playground and on the football field.

New York Jets Super Bowl MVP Joe Namath is excited to talk about the hyperbaric oxygen therapy that healed his brain at Jupiter Medical Center and the research being down right now at the center that bears his name.

“I've often said the only two bad things about the sport is getting hurt and losing.”

Joe Namath believes he had at least five major concussions where he lost consciousness.

When a former teammate told him about the major mental problems he was having that he lined to football injuries, Joe got worried about his own brain.

“I didn't think I had symptoms except for those minor kind of forgetful things, but because of my teammate seeing what he was going through and knowing I had concussions, I had to find out,” he said.

When the scans came back he and the doctors saw cells on the left side of his brain, in the back that weren't getting blood flow. They were dark compared to the rest of the brain.

“We started the process of hyperbaric chamber oxygen treatment. I took 120 dives over 8 months and after the first 40 dives, the cells looked like they were getting lighter,” he said.

Namath says he had a final scan in March and said the doctors were high-fiving because they were so pleased with the results and the healthy brain cells they were looking at.

“I have a healthy brain and I’m thankful for the process and I know it works,” he said. He believes so much in the treatment that he loaned his name to the center.

And the treatment is not just for football players.

“I've seen people go through the process and I've seen improvement with their health, going from not being able to communicate to their parents and not being able to move their limbs, getting back into the workforce, communicating, living life again,” he said with a big smile.

A fundraiser in New York next week will help keep the clinical trials going at the Joe Namath Neurological Research Center at Jupiter Medical Center.

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